Tuesday, December 2, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks; Week 48; John Brumfield in LA

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. I began with my grandparents and am working my way back in time through the generations of my direct ancestors. Now I am writing about my 4x great grandparents.

John Brumfield
c 1768 – 1834 LA
My 4x great grandfather

John Brumfield was the oldest child of Charles & Elizabeth Brumfield. His siblings were: Elizabeth, Charety, James, Mary, Jesse & Isaac. John married Margaret Kelly on 23 October 1788 in Wake, NC.[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]

There are evidences that John and Margaret moved across the border to South Carolina. In 1796, while living in York Co., SC, Charles sold slaves to Jonathan Golden, millwright. John was a witness to the sale.[6] In 1800 both John and his father were in York Co., SC.[7]


John and Margaret moved once again,  leaving South Carolina with their family and traveling further south. On 8 November 1811 they received passports in Georgia to travel through “the Indian Nations to the Western Country.” The passports were for “Mr. John Brumfield with his wife and eleven children and three negroes from York District.”[8]

They traveled on to Washington Parish, LA where they remained. “Most of the original settlers of what is now Washington Parish came from South and North Carolina, others from families having migrated from the State of Virginia to Kentucky and Tennessee.”[9]

In 1820 the family was in Washington Parish, LA.[10] In 1830 Edmund Andrews was the largest slave holder in the parish with four men, including John Brumfield, just behind with 20 to 24 slaves each. They were cotton planters.[11]




[1] Brumfield Family information from Ron Frazer, researcher in Silver Spring, Florida; Some of his info from "the Brumfield Family" by Alma Dell Clawson.
[2] Randolph, Ruth Brumfield, and Nell Brumfield Jacobs Smith. Brumfields Revisited: Ancestors and Descendants of George Y. and Martha Penny Brumfield. Privately printed, 1995.
[3] Conerly, Luke Ward, Source Records from Pike County, Mississippi 1798-1910; 1798-1910; South Carolina, Southern Historical Press, 1989.
[4] Last Will & Testament & Estate papers of Charles Brumfield, 1815; Case #10, File #405; South Carolina Archives & History, 8301 Parklane Road, Columbia, SC.
[5] Clawson, A. D. (1972). Fields of Broom: John Brumfield and Margaret Kelly, their Ancestors & Descendants.
[6] Holcomb, Brent H. York County, South Carolina Will Abstracts 1787 - 1862 [1170 - 1862]. Columbia, SC: SCMAR, 2002. 975.743 page 124.
[7] Teeples, G. Ronald, Ronald Vern Jackson, and Richard Moore. South Carolina 1800 Census. Provo, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems, 1973. page 69. Charles and John Brumfield.
[8] Potter, Dorothy Williams. Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770 - 1823. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.
[9] Carter, Hon. Prentiss. History of Washington Parish: As Compiled from the Records & Traditions. From Washington Parish Library, Franklinton, LA.
[10] 1820 U S Census; Washington, Louisiana; Page: 37; NARA Roll: M33-31; Image: 194. The John Brumfield family.
[11] Williams, E. R. (1994). History of Washington Parish, Louisiana, 1798-1992: the story of a land and people on three rivers: the Pearl, the Bogue Chitto, and the Tangipahoa in southeast Louisiana. Monroe, La. (514 Cole Ave., 71203): Williams Genealogical and Historical Publications.



4 comments:

  1. A passport? Hmm, it never occurred to me that traveling through Indian territory required papers. That must be an interesting document.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dorothy Williams Potter's book is a great resource for this information.

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  2. Colleen with this awesome heritage wouldn't you like to pack up 11 childen and move them acoss Indian territory to Louisanna. That's about an 800 mile journey.

    ReplyDelete

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