Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The Estate of Reuben Lawrence, 1843 NC

Finding an estate of a family member is always interesting. I like to see the list of items they used in their lives. This estate is especially interesting because it tells us which family member purchased each item and how much they paid.

If you are interested look at all the estate papers on Ancestry. There are many pages.

Reuben Lawrence 
Reuben Lawrence, son of Humphrey Lawrence , b c 1748 NC
My 6th Great Uncle




The Estate of Reuben Lawrence
Bertie County, North Carolina

Estate settled 1843

Note:
Mrs. Frances Lawrence was the widow of Reuben Lawrence.
Frederick & Alphus (?) were his sons.
James R. Ryent was his son-in-law & husband of Frances.



doz. Windsor Chairs                            Mrs. Frances Lawrence              $1.00
set dining tables                                   ditto                                        1.00
desk                                                     ditto                                         .25
Lot Books                                            ditto                                        1.00
Brass clock                                           ditto                                        1.00
2 tables                                                ditto                                         .25
safe + contents                                     ditto                                         .25
small bed                                             ditto                                         .25
3 chests                                                ditto                                        .50
Lot water + pitchers                            ditto                                          .05
Set crockery + spoons                          ditto                                          .50
Lot old chairs                                      ditto                                          .25
Bed + furniture                                   ditto                                        1.00
Bed + two pillows                                ditto                                        1.00
Table + Trunk                                     ditto                                          .50
Wash bowl                                          ditto                                          .05
Saddle + Bridle                                   Nathaniel F. F. Lawrence           .05
Grain fan                                             Alphus Lawrence                     5.00
Set Black Smith Tools                         James R. Ryent                         5.00
Ox cart                                              Mrs. Frances Lawrence              1.00
Double Gig                                          ditto                                        1.00
Single Gig                                            ditto                                        1.00
Work ox                                              ditto                                        1.00
Lot ploughs (plow)                              ditto                                        1.00
Spade                                                   ditto                                         .25
2 Grub hors (horse)                             ditto                                           .25
Lot working hors (horse)                     ditto                                           .50
Gray mare                                            ditto                                        10.00
Black horse                                          N. F. F. Lawrence                    10.00
7 Sheep                                                Mrs. Frances Lawrence               1.75
cow + calf                                            ditto                                          1.00
Yoke young Oxen                                A. Lawrence                               6.50
Spotted Hefr (heifer)                           R. T. F.                                      2.00
Black spotted hefr (heifer)                   James Ryent                               2.00
Red crumpled horn hefr (heifer)          ditto                                          2.05
Hifer (heifer)                                       ditto                                          2.55
Lot Hollow ware                                 Mrs. Frances Lawrence               1.00
Table + 3 Trays                                   ditto                                            .50
Sow + 5 Shoats                                   ditto                                          2.50
Sow + 2 Shoats                                    ditto                                          2.00
7 hogs                                                  ditto                                          7.00
10 hogs                                                A. Lawrence                               4.75
Gig + Plough (plow)                            Mrs. Frances Lawrence                 1.00

                                   

Source: North Carolina Wills and Probate records, 1665 – 1998; Estate Inventory of Reuben Lawrence; digital image, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed January 2019). 


Friday, April 19, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: OUT OF PLACE: Keep Your Research in Place

Amy Johnson Crow challenges us to remember our ancestors and their families through this task: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. I completed ’52 Ancestors’ in 2014 & here I go again. This post is in response to that challenge. The topic for this week is OUT OF PLACE.


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: OUT OF PLACE: Keep Your Research in Place



This week’s prompt is difficult. I tried to think of a family member who turned up in an unlikely location but if I have folks in unlikely locations, they are still there, waiting to be discovered. 

I do, however, know something about records that are OUT OF PLACE. I am continually organizing and reorganizing my records and yet, there are times when I cannot find a particular book or map or document. I look everywhere and usually find it OUT OF PLACE, where it does not belong.

The more I research the more my records have expanded. Everything once fit in one large binder. Now I have a filing cabinet, a desk, two bookcases and a laptop full of data (not counting photos). My filing cabinet has four drawers & each drawer contains materials related to a surname of one of my four grandparents. Those materials include greeting cards, hand drawn family trees, documents, funeral cards, etc. On each side of my desk are bookcases. One bookcase is devoted to my mother’s family & the other to my father’s family. Their families came from different areas. My mother’s bookcase has many books mostly about Ireland and early New York City. My father’s bookcase has books from several states including: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana & Mississippi. I often wish those bookcases could hold more books and journals. 

Doesn’t that sound nicely organized? Did I mention I usually have a pile of papers and books that need to be sorted out? Did I mention the assorted boxes of mementos in the closet that need to be labeled? Maybe, just maybe, there are a couple things that are OUT OF PLACE. 

If I were to give tips to a new genealogist I would say select an organizational system & stick with it. Your research is not valuable if you cannot find it. And every piece of paper needs a full source citation for the facts to have any value. You worked hard to find your facts. Now don’t let them get OUT OF PLACE. 





Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Obituary: Andrew Jackson Alford, 1944 MS

 Pike Man Dies in Chicago

Funeral Services for A. J. Alford Will Be Held at Silver Springs Church



Photo from Find A Grave Memorial # 16343957


Funeral Services for A. J. Alford, age 77, retired farmer of McComb, Route 2, will be held at 11 o’clock Saturday morning at the Silver Springs Baptist church and he will be laid to rest in the Silver Springs cemetery.

The Rev. W. F. Hudson will officiate at the final rites, assisted by the Rev. J. A. McCraw, and serving as pallbearers will be Fred Fortenberry, Claude Alford, Bernie Schilling, Talmadge Alford, Howard Alford and Kenneth Simmons.

Mr. Alford died Thursday in Chicago, Illinois, where he had gone for medical examination. His body was scheduled to arrive in McComb on Illinois Central Train No. 3 Friday afternoon and will lie at rest at his home until time for the funeral services.

Mr. Alford was born on July 2, 1866, and was married in December 1889 to Miss Janie E. Fortenberry. Alford was a prominent farmer in this section of Pike county for many years and was well liked by his neighbors and friends.


He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, Mrs. A> J. Alford, and a number of nieces and nephews.

Hartman Funeral Home is in charge.

Source: Pike Man Dies in Chicago. (McComb, MS: Enterprise-Journal, 1 July 1944) 1; digital image, Newspapers.com: accessed January 2019.




Saturday, April 13, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: DNA, Unique or Common?

Amy Johnson Crow challenges us to remember our ancestors and their families through this task: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. I completed ’52 Ancestors’ in 2014 & here I go again. This post is in response to that challenge. The topic for this week is DNA.


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: DNA, Unique or Common?



DNA. What is it? I looked for a definition before responding to this topic for ‘52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks’. I found these definitions online:

·      DeoxyriboNucleic Acid

·     sometimes called "the molecule of life," as almost all organisms have their genetic material codified as DNA.

·     a self-replicating material which is present in nearly all living organisms as the main constituent of chromosomes. It is the carrier of genetic information.

·     the fundamental and distinctive characteristics or qualities of someone or something, especially when regarded as unchangeable.

·       contained in your body's cells. It is a double, long chain of molecules called nucleotides that tell each cell what proteins to make. The DNA itself makes up chromosomes.

I would define DNA as a tool for genealogists.


Unique. It is interesting that these definitions point out the uniqueness of every individual’s DNA. Despite the huge number of humans on our planet, each of us is distinctive, irreplaceable & exceptional. As genealogists, we celebrate all the individuals in our families, both the shining examples to the younger generations and the black sheep who teach us life lessons. 

As we research those ancestors a few pop out at us individuals we especially relate to. Their stories charm us and we put more effort into discovering all we can about them. We may even imagine sitting down with them and having a deep conversation. 

Common. However, it is the elements that make us the same that we seek. We want to find others whose similarities show us to be family members. We want to share & compare with those family members to learn more about our common ancestors. 

I have taken the Ancestry DNA test. There were no surprises there. My ‘DNA Story’ shows me to be 47% Great Britain, 27% European Jewish, 25% Ireland/Scotland/Wales & 1% Baltic States. This does reinforce that my research is on track.

I have pages of DNA matches. I do sometimes reach out to people who share common DNA with me. In most cases I never hear back from those people. A few have responded and we have shared information. It has advanced my research in small ways. I have no dramatic stories of discoveries. 

Ancestry’s DNA Circles, now ThruLines, is helpful. Even if people do not respond to my attempts to communicate, I look at shared trees and sources for the facts shown. This leads to taking more small steps in my research.

DNA, Both Unique & Common. I see DNA as another tool for genealogists/family historians but not an answer to all our questions. I use any tool I can to get me back to my unique ancestors.



Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Old Cemetery Found

I was searching through Newspapers.com for information on my Ott family in Louisiana & Mississippi. I found this story about a search for the lost Ott family cemetery. I searched for the names in the newspaper article on Find A Grave but did not find them. Maybe you know some of the folks found in the cemetery. It was disappointing that my Otts were not found but maybe these names will help someone else.


Old Cemetery Found




Last Aug. 23 we mentioned finding a lost Pike County cemetery site close to the Louisiana line. This brought up questions about a lost Ott burial site and another cemetery hunt was made a few weeks ago in the same area.

Paul Ott Carruth of Dixie Springs, Margaret McNeese and Walter Wesley Ott of Osyka and ourselves [Kathryn Cole and Paul Mogan] found nothing that trip. Happily word of a possible site near the place the second search was made got down to some of us, and a third expedition was launched on Jan. 27, this time with some success.

An abandoned cemetery was found just south of Osyka on the Louisiana side. It is near the Old German Cemetery in a field about 200 yards from Highway 51. There are markers and a list follows. Some of the markers were badly broken and had to be fitted together like jigsaw puzzle pieces to be read and some had to be dug up. There is a good possibility that some Ott family members are buried here, though no Ott marker was found.

Ruth Ott Wallis wrote n her Ott family history, published several years ago, that Jacob Jackson Ott, an ancestor of many of this area’s citizens, was born in 1817 in Mount Hermon, La., and died in 1869, and was buried in Osyka “in a cemetery which has long been abandoned.” His grave was one of the objects of the search. The cemetery just discovered, however, has been in use at least as late as 1964.

Buried here were:
Thorton Bender, died 1905, age 78
Thorton Bender, died 1895, age 29
Charles W. Bender, died 1932, age 74
Willie Brown, died 1905, age 27
Florence Brown, wife of Sam, age 24
Dollie Brown, wife of Doublin, died 1898
Celia Cutrer, wife of James, died 1882
Alvin Johnson, 1900-1902
Thomas E. Johnson, 1911-1964, served in Infantry, World War II
Dolly Penilton, wife of A., 1868-1907
Ulysses C., son of A. D. Penilton, 1900-1907
Children of R. and H. Smith
        Laura, with no dates, and Louis, age 13
Clara Winners, 1904-1911
A marker with too many pieces missing to be fully read was (Jos)ephine, (daug)hter of –iah & --

Checking area marriage records, we found four listings for the name Andrew Johnson. One or more Anderew Johnsons married Matilda Monroe in 1882, Annie Petra Everson in 1882, Nellie Bender in 1885, and MIlly Selby in 1900, all Pike County. Also a Doublin Brown married Dolly Gaitlin in 1896. No pertinent marriages were found in Louisiana lists, but the Johnson dates would fit the inscription on Andrew’s marker, and the names and dates for Dollie Brown fit perfectly. 

We heard that some of the markers originally in this cemetery were pushed aside down to a nearby creek bed. Does anyone have information on this cemetery, just south of Osyka in Louisiana, please get in touch. Was it a church cemetery or a private cemetery? Were some or all of these burials that are listed added to a pre-existing older cemetery that might be the one sought for Jacob Jackson Ott? We would appreciate even a clue as to the identity of the cemetery.

If any of the listed persons are related to you and you would like to visit the cemetery, call us and we will tell you how to find it and how to go about getting permission to go on the land.

Connecting Lines, Route 2, Box 230, Osyka, Miss. 39657; 601-542-5013



Source: Cole, Kathryn and Paul Mogan, Old Cemetery Found. (McComb, MS: Enterprise-Journal, 7 Feb 1982) 14; digital image, Newspapers.com: accessed February 2019.

Saturday, April 6, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: BRICK WALL = Edward Brown, 1730 – 1797 NC

Amy Johnson Crow challenges us to remember our ancestors and their families through this task: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. I completed ’52 Ancestors’ in 2014 & here I go again. This post is in response to that challenge. The topic for week #14 = BRICK WALL.


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: BRICK WALL

What is a genealogical BRICK WALL? It is a person, an ancestor. When we want to learn about our family we start with the present day members and work backwards in time. We learn all we can about each generation and then move backwards as far as we can. But then we reach a person and the information stops as if we hit a BRICK WALL. We just cannot find a record that gives that person’s parents and/or place of birth. 

I have more than one brick wall. I’d love to knock down this one and discover who is on the other side.




BRICK WALL = Edward Brown c 1730 – c 1797 NC
My 5th Great Grandfather

This is a portion from my next book, Our Brown Roots.

As an introduction to Edward Brown, we have a summary of his life that was published when Edward’s grandson, Moses Brown, Jr., died in 1912. A newspaper published a lengthy article about Moses’ life, including a brief history of his father, Moses Brown, and his grandfather, Edward Brown. This was printed well over one hundred years after Edward died and the story was, most likely, handed down over those many years. Inaccuracies or exaggerations might have crept into the tale. Keeping that in mind, here is what the newspaper published regarding Edward Brown.

Edward Brown, was born in Newburn, N. C. His family were Scotch Quakers, opposed to war but in favor of independence, and he with the resident Quakers of the county attended the Mechlinburg convention where the first constitution of the United States was framed a year before the Jefferson, and was one of the eight signers; was a soldier in the army until the close of the war.[i][This constitution, supposedly written in North Carolina in May 1775, has not been proved. The original copy was lost to fire.]

The earliest residence that can be proved for Edward Brown was Edgecombe County, North Carolina. On 12 September 1749 William Bryant wrote his will in the county and the executors of his will were Edward Brown and Abram Dew.[ii]This could be another Edward Brown. However, in 1795 when Edward wrote his will one of his executors was his friend, Joseph Dew.[iii]Families often traveled together. Many genealogies document two or more families living in one area and then traveling together to a new location. It would not be uncommon for the Brown and Dew families to move from one county to another, helping each other set up homes in a new location. Thus the Dew and Brown families could have been friends and neighbors. In 1752 Edward was still in Edgecombe County when he witnessed the will of Luke Thomas.[iv]In 1756 Edward’s name appeared in the county’s records again when Thomas Weathersbe bought 258 acres of land. The land joined “Cypress Swamp, Edward Brown and the Horse Swamp.”[v]Edward Brown did not remain in the area but moved further south to Craven County, which became Jones County. 
Edward purchased two tracts of land in Craven County in 1761. A summary of those transactions follows.

Deed from Daniel Shines planter of Craven Co to Edward Brown planter of same, 24 Feb 1761. 100 pounds proclamation. 70 acres called New Jarmany, on the south side of Trent River, joining James Black Shear, Cypress Creek, Pecoson Branch. Wit: Jacob Humphry, Abraham Gray. Proved Oct Ct 1761 before Peter Conway C. C.[vi]

Deed from William Brown planter of Craven Co to Edward Brown. 17 Dec 1761. 40 pounds proclamation. 100 acres on the north side of the Trent River near Limestone Branch. Wit: William Isler, John (x) Sanders. Proved Apr Ct 1762 before Peter Conway C.J.C.[vii]

            In 1766 Edward Brown owned land on the north side of the Trent River in Craven County.[viii]In 1769 he was on the list of taxpayers in the county.[ix]In May 1770 Edward bought 100 more acres on the north side of the Trent River from Jacob Connup.[x]In March 1778 Edward bought another 50 acres, land that extended his property line along the river.[xi]
            On 14 May 1785 Edward Brown “and wife, Jemimiah” sold 15 acres of land on the south side of the Trent River to Vinson Branson for 25 British pounds.[xiv]
            In July 1788 Edward bought 25 more acres that joined his land. In 1789 Edward purchased two pieces of land that joined his land. On 14 January he bought 100 acres and on 28 September he bought 400 acres for 20 British pounds.[xv]
            Besides land records and tax lists there is evidence of the Edward Brown family in Jones County as related to the Quaker meetings. Oldest sons, John and Aaron, were old enough to join on their own. John Brown was a member in 1788 and Aaron in 1789. Edward, Moses, Daniel and Hardy were brought along by their father in 1789 to become members.[xvi]
            On 8 January 1790 President George Washington gave the first State of the Union Address. 1790 was also the year of the first United States Census. Thomas Jefferson was the Census Bureau Director and the U. S. Marshalls were assigned the responsibility to be sure every household was visited. Almost four million citizens were counted.[xvii]Edward Brown’s household in Jones County, North Carolina included 3 free white males over 16 years, 3 free white males under 16 years and 2 free white females.[xviii]At that time the US Congress was meeting in New York City. In 1791 Washington, D. C. was established as the capital of the United States. In 1792 the Post Office Department was established.[xix]
Aaron Brown acquired land that connected to his father’s land in 1792. His two land transactions equaled 66 acres of land on the Trent River.[xx]
            Edward’s holdings continued to grow with two purchases and a land grant in 1793. In March he purchased 400 acres and in October he purchased 80 more acres that bordered and then expanded his land.[xxi]On 26 November 1793 he was issued a land grant for 15 acres of land, again on the north side of the Trent River.[xxii]The next year he was issued two more land grants, one for 40 acres and the other for 80 acres.[xxiii]
            On 10 August 1795 Edward Brown wrote his last will and testament. His six sons and one grandson are named in this document. Sons Aaron, Hardy, Edward, Moses and Daniel were to each receive 215 acres of land. Hardy, Moses and Daniel were to own all the horses and cattle. Hardy, Edward, Moses and Daniel were to own the hogs. Aaron, Hardy, Edward, Moses and Daniel were to each receive a feather bed and furniture. His son, John, did not receive any land or livestock but was given 20 British Shillings. Edward’s grandson, Moses Brown [son of John Brown], was to receive 50 British pounds.[xxiv]
            Edward Brown died circa 1797. Jones County records show that the vast land holdings he had acquired over the years and then willed to his sons were sold off over the next decade.[xxv]

Related Posts:







[ii]North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665 – 1998, Edgecombe County, William Bryant, 12 September 1749; ancestry.com.
[iii]North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665 – 1998, Jones County, Edward Brown, 10 August 1795; ancestry.com.
[iv]North Carolina Wills and Probate records, 1665 – 1998, Edgecombe County, Luke Thomas, 28 June 1751; Volume 31 – 33; ancestry.com.
[v]Hofmann, Margaret M., The Granville District of North Carolina, 1748 – 1763: Abstracts of Land Grants Volume One (1986) 133.
[vi]Bradley, Stephen E., Craven County, North Carolina Deeds, Wills, and Inventories, 1742 – 1801: Volume 2(Lawrenceville, VA, 2001) 21.
[vii]Bradley, Stephen E., Craven County, North Carolina Deeds, Wills, and Inventories, 1742 – 1801: Volume 2(Lawrenceville, VA, 2001) 30.
[viii]North Carolina Land Grant Images and Data, Craven County; Book 18, page 271; Grant 134, file 2708; Benjamin Messer; nclandgrants.com. Land bordered by Edward Brown.
[ix]North Carolina Tax Payers, 1679 – 1790; Volume 2; Edward Brown, page 27; ancestry.com.
[x]Pruitt, A. B., Abstracts of Deeds Craven County, N. C.(NC: privately printed, 2007) 73.
[xi]Pruitt, A. B., Abstracts of Land Entries: Craven County, N. C., 1778 – 1796 (NC: privately printed, 1991) 6.
[xii]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina.
[xiii]North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693 – 1960; Edward Brown, Jones County, North Carolina; ancestry.com. Grant #110, Book 44, Page 98, issued 22 Oct 1782.
[xiv]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina.
[xv]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina. Page 27.
[xvi]North Carolina Quaker Meeting; ancestry.com; Edward Brown and sons.
[xvii]‘Pop Culture 1790’, History, US Census Bureau; census.gov.
[xviii]1790 US Census, NC, Jones Co; M637, Roll 7, Page 425. Edward Brown household.
[xix]‘Pop Culture 1790’, History, US Census Bureau; census.gov.; accessed Jan. 2017.
[xx]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina. Page 40.
[xxi]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina. Page 42.
[xxii]North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693 – 1960; Edward Brown, Jones County, North Carolina; ancestry.com. Grant #481, Book 81, Page 381, issued 26 Nov 1793.
[xxiii]North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693 – 1960; Edward Brown, Jones County, North Carolina; ancestry.com. Grant #528, Book 86, Page 119, issued 6 Dec 1794 & Grant #538, Book 86, Page 123, issued 6 Dec 1794.
[xxiv]North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665 – 1998, Jones County, Edward Brown, 10 August 1795; ancestry.com.
[xxv]Gwynn, Zae Hargett. Abstracts of the Records of Jones County, North Carolina, 1779 - 1868. Volume I. Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1963. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, North Carolina.