Friday, February 10, 2017

Thomas Ashely, Sr. in North Carolina


 Thomas Ashley, Sr.
My 8th Great Grandfather


At this time the early life of Thomas Ashley, Sr. is unknown. His patents, birth year and birth location are unknown. What we do know about Thomas, a blacksmith, comes from the court records of Bertie County, North Carolina.
Thomas Ashley, Sr. first appears in documents in 1734 when Thomas was the witness to two land transactions. Daniel Frazor and Robert West sold land to each other on 6 May 1734. Two years later he witnessed a deed between George Phenney and Thomas Jones.[i]
            On 3 August 1739 “Thomas Ashley, blacksmith, & wife Ann” were in Bertie County Court once again. They sold 340 acres of land on Rawquiss Swamp to Edward Howkett for 60 British pounds.[ii]
            On 2 August 1740 Thomas Lovick sold to Thomas Ashley 150 acres on Black Walnut Swamp. Thomas Lovick was the executor of the will of Laurence Larson and sold the land in that role. Thomas Ashley paid 30 British pounds for the land.[iii]
            Thomas Ashley and his wife, Ann, had at least one child, Thomas Ashley, Jr. born circa 1710. There is evidence of Thomas Ashley, Jr. in Bertie County on 10 August 1742 when his father sold him 120 acres of land on Cashoke Creek. Thomas Ashley, Jr. paid 100 British pounds for the land adjacent to Henry Van Luven’s land. One of the witnesses to the transaction was William Ashley who may have been a family member.[iv],[v] William’s name appears in many records of the county.[vi]
            Thomas Ashley “the Elder” sold 50 acres on Black Walnut Swamp to Samuel Cook four British pounds May 13, 1747.[vii]
            On 16 May 1753 Thomas Ashley, Sr., blacksmith, sold 100 acres of land on Black Walnut Swamp to Richard Lakey.[viii] On 23 April 1759 he sold 50 acres of land to Patience Demsey. The land was:

50 acres on south side of Solomon Creek, joining Florence Branch, Waters Branch.[ix]

This is the last reference to Thomas Ashley, Sr. in the courthouse records. His death date is unknown.







[i] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757 (2nd Edition). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Pages 99 & 114.
[ii] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757 (2nd Edition). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Page 148.
[iii] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757 (2nd Edition). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Page 157.
[iv] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 – 1757 (2nd Edition ed.). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc., page 174. Aug. Court 1742. Deed Book F, 317.
[v] Haun, Weynette Parks. Bertie County North Carolina County Court Minutes 1740 thru 1743; 1758 thru 1762. Book II. North Carolina: 1977. From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte, NC.
[vi] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757 (2nd Edition). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc.
[vii] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757(2nd Edition ed.). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc., page 190. May Court 1747. Deed Book G, 31.
[viii] Bell, M. B. (1963). Colonial Bertie County, North Carolina: Deed Books A - H, 1720 - 1757(2nd Edition ed.). Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc., page 234. May Court 1754. Deed Book H 99.
[ix] Bradley, S. E. (1992). The deeds of Bertie County, North Carolina, 1757-1772. Keysville, VA: S.E. Bradley. Page 13.

1 comment:

  1. He left a lot of good records! Were property taxes collected then? If they are available, they can help you pinpoint dates of birth and death.

    ReplyDelete

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