Tuesday, October 7, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks = Week #40; Michael Coyle

This prompt comes from Amy Johnson Crow at her blog, No Story Too Small. She suggests we write once a week about a specific ancestor.

I have been moving back through time & generations as I write for this prompt and, naturally, as I move back in time, especially to other countries, evidences of my family are more incomplete and imperfect. I have some limited knowledge of Irish records; have used Find My Past & Roots ie; and hired a genealogist in Ireland; but still results are meagre. 


Michael Coyle
b c 1805 Ireland
My 3x Great Grandfather

St. Paul’s Ballymachugh Church, Co Cavan, Ireland. 
Several Children of Michael Coyle & Mary Cunningham were baptized here.

Michael Coyle married Mary Cunningham, born c 1810 and the daughter of James Cunningham. Her siblings were: Laurence, Anne, Catherine, Bridget & Rose.[1]

Michael & Mary were married 31 August 1833 in County Westmeath, Ireland.[2] The witnesses at their wedding were Bridget Cunningham [most likely the bride’s sister] and Terence Brady [in the future their son would marry a Brady].

In 1837 Michael was still in County Westmeath, according to the voters register.[3] After that they moved across the county border to County Cavan where their four children were born: James Coyle[4], Patrick Coyle[5], Margaret Coyle[6] and Michael Coyle.[7]

Mary did not live to see her children become adults. She died 25 January 1848 in Moate, Co Cavan, Ireland.[8] Michael’s death date is unknown at this time.


1 Michael Coyle b: Abt. 1805 in Ireland, d: Unknown
... + Mary Cunningham b: c 1810 Ireland, m: 31 Aug 1833 Ireland, d: 25 Jan 1848 Moate, Cavan, Ireland
......2 James Coyle b: 01 Mar 1839 Magherboy, Cavan, Ireland, d: Unknown
......2 Patrick Coyle b: 20 May 1841 Moate, Cavan, Ireland, d: 21 Jun 1925 Milford, New Haven, CT
...... + Margaret Brady b: c 1855 Killykeen, Cavan, Ireland, m: 11 Feb 1870 Granard, Cavan
County, Ireland, d: 22 Nov 1934 Waterbury, New Haven, CT
......2 Margaret Coyle b: 29 Aug 1843 Cavan, Ireland, d: Unknown
......2 Michael Coyle b: 7 Mar 1847 in Moate, Cavan, Ireland, d: Unknown



[1] 1821 Irish Census, Drumlummon, , Cavan Genealogy, Johnston Central Library, Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland.
[2] Marriage Record for Michael Coil & Mary Cunningham, Mount Nugent Parish, Co Westmeath, 31 August 1933. Rootsireland.ie
[3] Electoral Register, 25 March 1837, Michael Coyle in Borough of Anthlone, Co Westmeath. Findmypast.ie
[4] Baptismal record for James Coyle, 1 March 1839, Register 33a, page 12, Ballymachugh Roman Catholic Church Records, Cavan Genealogy, Johnston Central Library, Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland.
[5] Baptismal record for Patrick Coyle, 20 May 1841, Register 33a, Page 30, Ballymachugh Roman Catholic Church, Cavan Genealogy, Johnston Central Library, Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland.
[6] Baptismal record for Margaret Coyle, 29 August 1843, Register 33a, Page 48, Ballymachugh Roman Catholic Church, Cavan Genealogy, Johnston Central Library, Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland.
[7] Baptismal record for Michael Coyle, 7 March 1847, Register 33a, Page 76, Ballymachugh Roman Catholic Church, Cavan Genealogy, Johnston Central Library, Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland.
[8] Record of Death for Maria Cunningham Coyle in Moate, 25 Jan 1848; Parochial Registers of Drumlumman South and Ballymachugh, 1837 - 1935, Diocese of Ardagh and Clonmacnois, Carrick Finea Parish, Microfilm #1279229, Family History Library, Loudonville, New York. Record of Death page 16.

6 comments:

  1. 8 records -- that's impressive even when you think you don't know much.

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    1. Wendy, you're right. Nice to have another perspective.

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  2. That's a pretty impressive list of resources, nonetheless, Colleen, as Wendy mentioned.

    As we move back in time, I keep reminding myself not to be so jealous of those whose research has brought them back to such dates as the 1600s. Most of those, I've begun to notice, are tracing ancestors in the United States, where records for even the common people are accessible. In contrast, the brick wall that is found in Ireland may very well be the absence of church records at all before the early 1800s. While I hope there is another way around such roadblocks, it seems for now that there may not be...

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    Replies
    1. Jacqi, You are right. Irish sources as we travel back through the years become sparse.

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  3. My Irish lines were the most recent of my own finds. But ever so slowly, like you, I'm picking up clues. Keep up the good work!

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