Saturday, August 16, 2014

Sepia Saturday: World War I Sweetheart Letter

This week's topic at Sepia Saturday is Letters Home. The photos shows soldiers diligently writing home. I just had to add to the collection not because I have a photo of a soldier to share but because I have a World War I letter written by a soldier.  This letter was not written to Mother & Father. It was written to a sweetheart.








This letter was written 
15 November 1918
by 
Private Herman L. Englander: HQrs Co. 358th Infantry: Amr. Exp. Forces, France.

It was written to my maternal grandmother, Helen F. Coyle.

I'd love to hear from someone related to the soldier.

I will share the full text of the letter in a future blog post.

20 comments:

Little Nell said...

How wonderful that you have this letter still; of course we are now all waiting to hear what it said!

Little Nell said...

Colleen, you may wonder why the comments are few, this may be because you have word verification switched on. None of the regulars on Sepia Saturday uses this any more, and you may like to consider switching it off and relying on comment moderation, which seems to work quite well.

Postcardy said...

The postcard I posted was written the same week.

Helen Killeen Bauch McHargue said...

It must have been a thrill to receive one of those letters.

Wendy said...

And a nice long letter as well. I'll look forward to reading what it says.

Marian B. Wood said...

Please do tell us what was in this love letter! Very curious to know.

Anonymous said...

Can't wait for the full text. You're so lucky to have this letter.

21 Wits said...

Ah yes, I am looking forward to the rest!

Anonymous said...

that's a story only half told - let us have the rest soon please?

La Nightingail said...

Like everyone else has expressed here, I'll be waiting to find out what the letter says. :))

Unknown said...

So...Herman Englander did NOT marry your grandmother? He was an old boyfriend? How wonderful that she saved it! I hope you hear from somebody related to him! Let us all know...

Alex Daw said...

It must be amazing to have such an old letter. Just to think - it has lasted all these years.

Alex Daw said...

Aren't you lucky to have a letter that is so old! Standing by with bated breath for the translation.

Sharon said...

I look forward to reading the contents of the letter.

Love the photo by the way.

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Not that's a coincidence.

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Fellow bloggers, check my blog on Friday, August 22 for the transcript of the letter. Glad to see so many people are interested. Many I will find the soldier's family.

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Alex, I wonder if he played a larger role in my grandmother's life than I know. Why else would she save the letter for such a long time. My mother saved it also but going through her mother's things was also a very emotional experience for her and she wanted to save everything.

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Deb, if I hear from anyone connected to Herman I will definitely blog about it! [fingers crossed]

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Nell, please check back on Friday, August 22.

Sherri said...

I love the way it begins: "I take the pleasure in writing to you and to let you know I have not forgotten you." The art of letter writing has truly been forgotten. Even those with just a few years of education seemed to know how to begin a sweet letter. I look forward to reading the full transcript on Friday.